Skip to main content

Press Kit





Press Release:                                                                                   Contact: IturiSun@gmail.com

Artist's Statement


“Field Mirror photography” is much more than photographing a reflection; it produces a visual alchemy that combines the physical world with that of the great mystery. Photographing with mirrors allows me to see the invisible, and capture a spirit, strength, and human dignity that remains hidden in straight photography. 

The use of elongation in indigenous and Western art has long been an archetype for the unconscious.  The yearning to greet the sun, and the grounded nature of roots, elongates the plant to reach skyward. Following in this tradition, I use my mirror to shine into the internal, deep spaces where we universally connect to something greater than ourselves. The artifact of the mirror illustrates the link between human consciousness and the natural world.

The archival pigment prints are made on rag paper.  I use a split-tones to symbolize our connection to the earth. These subtile tones are those of the earth as seen from space; blue, brown and the paper-white. The silvery blue tones in the highlights represent air; breath, sky, and ocean. The warm brown tones in the shadow areas denote the body of trees, animals, people, and the land. These tones, combined with the elongation, represent our interconnectedness to each other and to the natural world. 

The platinum prints are a single warm tone, with a luminous sheen. These prints use an emulsion made with the fine metal platinum, that is hand coated onto rag paper. Platinum printing is a fine art, 19th century photographic process. 

All my photographs are taken with medium and large format film cameras. There are no digital special effects in any of my work. The prints are all mirror reflections in a genre I refer to as, “field mirror photography.”  This is a technique I created and began using in 1983, in Paris.
I am a multi-racial American living in Normandy, France. My fascination with indigenous culture began at home with family stories when I was a child. Thank you so much for your interest in my work and story. 


Elisabeth Sunday, 2018


BIO

Between 1986 and 2012, American artist Elisabeth Sunday found her muse among indigenous people, mainly in Africa. Africa is a place of origins, devastating beauty, great troubles and unyielding expressions of life. Elisabeth traveled alone and lived among various original peoples who amidst a changing world, have clung tenaciously to traditional ways of life. From the hunter-gatherers dwelling in the primeval forests of the Congo Basin, to the nomadic tribes inhabiting the vast stretches of the Sahara Desert, Sunday's photographs reveal an interplay of invisible forces that connect her subjects with the world of nature. Utilizing a flexible mirror of her own design, Sunday photographs reflections that blend and dissolve the boundaries between her figures and their environment. Sunday's images express an intimacy with a corresponding strength derived from that relationship.

Elisabeth Sunday is the progenitor of "Field Mirror Photography" and first began taking mirrors into the field in 1983. Her work is analogue (shot with film cameras) and therefore have no digital special effects. She designs large mirrors and has them built to specifications that yield unique visual effects. The mirror acts as a second lens, in this two lens system with marvelous and surprising results. Elisabeth is able to play with shapes outside of the normal plain of the camera lens to create images that are truly transcendent of the subject.

Her work has been widely exhibited in the United States and Europe and is in many museum collections including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Houston Art Museum, The Cleveland Museum of Art, the Corcoran Art Gallery, the Getty Museum, and many more. 

Nazraeli Press published her first monograph "Grace" in 2012. It is currently sold out.

She is currently living in Normandy, France.


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

AFRICA VIII: OMO VALLEY, 2011-2012

STUDIO NOTESfor studio updates
BODIES OF WORKwhere all the portfolios can be viewed from the dropdown menu

Client Home Album where my work can be viewed in client homes

AFRICA VIII: Omo Valley, Ethiopia, 2011-2012




AFRICA VII: AKAN, 2010/11

AFRICA VII: The Akan Fisherman, 2009-2011

THE AKAN FISHERMEN THE GOLD COAST, GHANA
Note about this series: The Akan Fishermen have been fishing the shores of West Africa over hundreds of generations.  I met six Akan fishermen along the shores of the Gold Coast in 2009. After talking a while, they began to express concern over the declining fisheries. They fish by night from handmade canoes using only lines and small nets. I asked the men if I could photograph them and they agreed. I urged them to express their love for the sea by using the fish they capture as metaphor in the way they hold them. They chose the fish and made their own poses understanding that their body language and expressions would tell their story. I photographed the same men in 2010 and again in 2011. This last March of 2011, they were much more comfortable with the camera and their deep connection to the sea  and to themselves is fully evident.

ANIMA AND ANIMUS

See ANIMA here: http://elisabethsundayphotography.blogspot.com/p/anima.html See ANIMUS here: http://elisabethsundayphotography.blogspot.com/p/animus.html
THE ANIMA SEQUENCE



Anima  and Animus 
anima: Latin: life, a living being, living; breath; soul; mind The Efe are one of the last remaining hunter-gatherer tribes on earth and live in the heart of deep Africa at its center, just below the equator. Their Eden is the fabled Ituri Rain Forest located in the Congo Basin about a thousand miles from either coast. The Efe introduced me first hand to their animist beliefs during my stay with them in 1988 and 1989. I was immediately fascinated by what I learned: that nature could be viewed not only as alive but as an integrated bio-system connecting everything that breathed to everything else in the environment. The Efe didn’t think of themselves as separate or a part from Nature, they were Nature, along with the trees, flutter of butterfly, creatures, winds, rainsoil: everything that is in the …